Melting Away

Melting Away
A Ten-Year Journey through Our Endangered Polar Regions
Camille Seaman

ISBN 9781616892609
Publication date 11/15/2014
10.625 x 8.5 inches (27.0 x 21.6 cm), Hardcover
160 pages, 200 color illustrations
Rights: World;

Available now

For ten years Camille Seaman has documented the rapidly changing landscapes of Earth's polar regions. As an expedition photographer aboard small ships in the Arctic and Antarctic, she has chronicled the accelerating effects of global warming on the jagged face of nearly fifty thousand icebergs. Seaman's unique perspective of the landscape is entwined with her Native American upbringing: she sees no two icebergs as alike; each responds to its environment uniquely, almost as if they were living beings. Through Seaman's lens, each towering chunk of ice, breathtakingly beautiful in layers of smoky gray and turquoise blue, takes on a distinct personality, giving her work the feel of majestic portraiture. Melting Away collects seventy-five of Seaman's most captivating photographs, life affirming images that reveal not only what we have already lost, but more importantly what we still have that is worth fighting to save.


Camille Seaman lives in Richmond, California, and lectures globally about her work and experiences




 No Longer Available:

(you may find a copy at one of my galleries)

The Last Iceberg.
Photographs by Camille Seaman. Text by Paul Hawken.
photolucida, Portland, OR, 2008. 64 pp., 29 color illustrations, 8½x10".

Publisher's Description
It is hardly possible to look at Camille Seaman’s icebergs as inert or insentient. Therein lies the gift these images bestow. Though they are made of ice, these massifs of the sea are as diverse and distinct as any terrestrial form. The tabular mesas broken off from the Weddell Ice Shelf are white glazed deserts. The crystal pinnacles cast off from Greenland seem to be mountaintops set adrift. Icebergs known as drydocks can have arches and bridges carved by rain and wind. Unstable pinnacles can invert themselves as they melt above sea line, creating localized tidal waves that can easily swamp a nearby boat.